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Toxic Makeup Best & Worst: Revlon review

How toxic are Revlon products?  Pic by www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

How toxic are Revlon products? Pic by http://www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Since my last toxic makeup review was on a high-end brand (Urban Decay-to read it, click here), I thought I would review a popular drugstore brand next.  Below is a quick rundown of some of Revlon’s best and worst rated makeup products.  The ratings were obtained from the Skin Deep database by the Environmental Working Group (which can be found at www.ewg.org/skindeep).  The rating scale is simple, ranging from 0-10 with 10 being the most toxic product score.  As always, please keep in mind that formulations in cosmetics are constantly changing.  Consequently, I encourage looking up product ratings before you buy them either on Skin Deep or www.goodguide.com (which also includes the company’s eco and social responsibility ratings).  While Revlon has quite a few low-toxin products (168 out of the 1022 current products rated), overall most of their products were in the moderate or high toxin range.  For the sake of brevity I did not list all 1022 products, but here are various examples of Revlon’s products and their ratings, starting from the worst scores.

10: Hair color.  Do you really want this absorbed into your head?

9: Colorstay Mineral Blush in Roseberry, Colorstay Blemish Concealer, Silky Powder Bronzer in Sunkissed Bronze, Age Defying Makeup Foundation with Botafirm for Dry Skin

8: Certain Moondrops crème lipsticks

7: Some Super Lustrous Lip Glosses (ex. shade Nude Lustre 040), Photoready Powder, ColorStay Foundation for Combination/Oily Skin

6: New Complexion One-Step Compact Makeup, Nail Care Liquid Quick Dry, Cream Blush in certain shades (ex. shade Rosy Glow)

5: Nearly Naked Makeup (ex. shade Warm Beige), PhotoReady BB Cream Skin Perfector, Illuminance Creme Eye Shadow (ex. shade 725 Va Va Va Bloom), Just Bitten Lip Stain & Balm (ex. shade Dawn),  ColorStay Ultimate Suede Lipstick (ex. shade Flashing Lights), Colorstay for Normal/Dry Skin Makeup with SoftFlex (ex. shade Sand Beige), ColorStay Liner For Lips

4: Matte Eye Shadow (ex. shade Vintage Lace), Colorstay 12-Hour Eye Shadow quads in certain shades, Luxurious Color Eye Line (ex. shade Black Velvet), Lip Butters (many hearts may be breaking over this, these are so popular!)

3: Certain shades of  PhotoReady Concealer Makeup, PhotoReady Cream Blush (ex. shade Coral Reef), PhotoReady Mousse Makeup in certain shades, ColorStay Whipped Creme Makeup in certain shades, Colorstay Aqua Mineral Finishing Powder-Translucent,  ColorStay 16-Hour Eye Shadow Quad (ex. shade Bombshell), Age Defying with DNA Advantage Cream Makeup, and nail polishes scored at least 3, at most 9

2: Super Lustrous Lipstick in many but not all shades, here’s a few: Sky Pink, Wine with Everything, Violet Frenzy, Peach Me, Smoky Rose, Coffee Bean, Apricot Fantasy, Sassy Mauve, Just Enough Buff, Cherries in the Snow; Photoready Kajal Intense Eye Liner & Brightener (ex. shade Purple Reign), Grow Luscious Waterproof Mascara, Custom Eyes Duo Shadow & Liner Palette (ex. shade Naturally Glamorous 020), Custom Eyes Mascara (ex. shade Blackened Brown 003), ColorStay Ultimate Liquid Lipstick in many but not all shades, here’s a few: Nude, Perfect Peony, Premier Pink, Prized Plum, Stellar Sunrise, and more; PhotoReady Eye Primer & Brightener, PhotoReady Makeup foundation (all shades)

1: ColorBurst Lipstick in the following shades: True Red 090, Rosy Nude 065, Fuschia 030

0: Remover for Lash Adhesive, Color Allure Nails, Medium nail glue

Please note I did not include products considered by Skin Deep to have an old formula (more than 3 years old), and also that not all shades of the same product will have the same score.  Approx. 16.4% of the products I viewed were low toxin, which is honestly more than I thought there would be.  But Revlon can certainly do better!  Poor scores resulted from toxic ingredients such as multiple parabens (linked to reproductive toxicity, hormone disruption), BHA (linked to cancer, organ toxicity, hormone disruption), methyl methacrylate (linked to developmental toxicity, for example, fetal exposure in utero, breastfeeding infants, direct application exposure while still developing), and many more.  Good Guide (www.goodguide.com), which rates product health, social, and environmental responsibility 0-10 (but with 10 being the best, no-toxin score) gives Revlon the following overall ratings: Health 1.9 (extremely poor), Environmental 3.9 (poor), and Social 3.9 (poor).  Visit their website for more information.

Do what you wish with this material.  Perhaps it will spur you on to changing your Revlon purchasing habits.  If you feel inclined to take further action, there is a form letter on the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics website that you cane-mail to Revlon asking them to remove harmful chemicals from their products.  They also have more information on the kinds of toxic ingredients in Revlon products as well as their linked health concerns (and much more).  Here is the page: http://org2.salsalabs.com/o/5500/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=15670

What did you think of Revlon’s ratings?  Were you surprised?  Please leave a comment below with your thoughts, questions, and requests for other brand reviews.  Be good to one another and thanks for reading.

Resources/For More Information:

www.ewg.org/skindeep

www.goodguide.com

www.safecosmetics.org

Not Just a Pretty Face by Stacy Malkan

“Be kind and compassionate to one another,” Ephesians 4:32

The video featuring some of the products mentioned:

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Toxic Makeup Best & Worst: Urban decay review

Urban Decay's logo

Urban Decay’s logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hello, Lovelies!  I’m back with another makeup brand review.  I previously reviewed E.L.F. Cosmetics (to read this review, click here).  This time we are looking at Urban Decay and spotlighting some of their best and worst health rated products.  As usual I use www.goodguide.com and www.ewg.org/skindeep to get these ratings.  Below I have listed current ratings as of this writing.  Don’t forget: product formulations are constantly changing so you may want to double check scores before purchasing.  For Good Guide (gg), 10=no toxin, 5-9=low toxin, 3-4=moderate toxin, 0-2=high toxin so the higher the number the better.  As for Skin Deep (sd), the ratings are opposite of Good Guide; 0=no toxin, 1-2=low toxin, 3-6=moderate toxin, 7-10=high toxin so the lower the number the better.  I included prices if available, but don’t fret, ebay and amazon are always loaded with discontinued makeup.  I included ratings on d/c’d products in case you have them in your stash.  Let’s highlight some of their low-toxin products first.  Urban Decay has quite a few low-toxin products.

The Best:

24/7 glide on lip pencils in all colors except Wicked (gg 7, sd 1 or 2); $19

Lip junkie lip glosses (gg5+); $19

Naked 2 eyeshadow palette of 12 shadows (all shades score well except for Blackout-gg 4; could not find score for Bootycall); $50

Most of their false lashes (gg 8); $15

Urbanglow cream highlight in the shades sin, wicked, and brown sugar (gg 8); $24

Cannonball ultra waterproof mascara (gg 8); $20

24/7 glide on eye pencils in the shades: zero, lust, perversion, ransom, rockstar, stash, demolition, underground, yayo, flipside, gunmetal, graffiti  (gg 6+, sd 2); $19 (some shades are on sale on www.sephora.com for only $6!)

Eyelash primer potion (gg 8) $20

Meltdown Make-Up Remover (gg 8); $24

Lipsticks in the following shades: gravity, trainwreck, jilted, vinyl, voodoo, wanted, buzzkill, requiem, revolution, midnight cowboy, lovechild, hot pants, rush, sellout, naked, apocalypse, peroxide, confession, and gash (gg 6+); *note: these are the old lipsticks, not to be confused with the brand new Revolution lipsticks that, to my knowledge, have not yet been rated.

Ammo eyeshadow box/palette – 10 Shades (gg 7); $34

Eyeshadow singles in the following shades: buck, darkhorse, roach, woodstock, foxy, baked, virgin, zephyr, s and m, smog, loaded, lost, tease, naked, verve, evidence, asphyxia, toasted, freelove, rockstar, blunt, bust, mildew, x, ydk, peace, flash, pistol, fishnet, bender, scratch, snakebite, busted, vanilla, mushroom, gravity, shattered, bordello, height, secret service, half baked, swf, radium, sellout, kush, snatch, suspect, last call, abc gum, psychedelic sister, acdc, twice baked, gunmetal, sin, grifter, midnight cowgirl, chopper, oil slick, stray dog, polyester bride, midnight cowboy, rodeo, midnight cowboy rides again, and the stardust eyeshadows (gg 5+); $18. *Note the older formulations of these shadows have much worse scores

Eyeshadow Primer Potion in sheer nude, eden, and greed (gg 6+); $20 (greed is on sale right now at www.sephora.com for only $10)

De-slick, All Nighter, and Dew Me setting sprays (gg 6); $14-29 depending on size

Revolver fragrance Oil (gg 6)

Guardian angel spray moisturizer SPF 8 (gg 6)

Stardust sparkling lip glosses in andromeda and space cowboy (gg 6)

Midnight cowboy body shimmer lotion (gg 5)

Rollergirl eyeshadow palette of four shadows (gg 5)

Worst:

It would take too long to list all 500 or so poorly rated products, so I’ll highlight a few.

Naked 1 palette of 12 shadows (gg 0); $50

Urban brow styling brush and setting gel  (gg 4); $20

Urbanglow Cream Highlight in the shade Moonshine (gg 4); $24

Many eyeshadow colors (too many to list), here’s an example of a few: cobra, blackout, chase, maui wowi (gg 0-4), $18

Big fatty waterproof mascaras (gg 2-4); $20

24/7 glide-on shadow pencils (gg 4); $20

The black palette (gg 4)

Loose pigments (gg 0)

Surreal skin mineral makeup and Surreal cream to powder foundations (gg 0, sd 3+); $31 and $35 respectively

De-slick mattifying face powder (sd 3); $32

Naked skin beauty balm (sd 5); $14-34 depending on size

Afterglow glide on cheek tint (gg 3-4); $24

24/7 Waterproof Liquid Eyeliner (gg 0); $19

Ultraglide lip glosses and xxx shine glosses (gg 0)

These bad scores are due to ingredients such as silica, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), propylene glycol, triethanolamine, and multiple parabens.  These are linked to health concerns such as cancer, organ toxicity, hormone disruption, and cellular level changes.  Overall, Urban Decay health product ratings are 2.8, their social responsibility rating is 3.2, and their environmental responsibility rating is also 3.2 (none too impressive).

So judge for yourself if Urban Decay is the right brand for you.  Most of their low-toxin products, while costly, are highly pigmented, beautiful, and have great staying power.  And remember that not all high-end makeup makes for good health quality products.

What are your thoughts on Urban Decay?  Leave a comment below.  As always, thanks for reading.

“Because you have made the Lord, who is my refuge, even the most high, your dwelling place, no evil shall befall you, nor shall any plague come near your dwelling for He shall give His angels charge over you to keep you in all your ways.” Psalm 91:9-11

References:

www.ewg.org/skindeep

www.goodguide.com

Malkin, S. (2007). Not Just a Pretty Face: The ugly side of the beauty industry. Gabriola Island, BC, Canada: New Society Publishers.

Quilty, D. (n.d.). What Is BHT And Why You Should Avoid It. In The Good Human. Retrieved September 24, 2009, from http://thegoodhuman.com/2009/09/24/what-is-bht-butylated-hydroxytoluene-and-why-you-should-avoid-it/

Marc Jacobs Beauty Style Eye-Con No. 7: First impressions review and swatches

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7.  Picture by www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7. Picture by http://www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs is launching his own beauty line, Marc Jacobs Beauty.  When I got the e-mail from Sephora about this it piqued my interest.  The collection preview on Sephora’s website consists of Style Eye-Con No. 7 Plush Shadow palettes (7 refers to the number of shadows), two Style Eye-Con No. 3 trios, the Lust for Lacquer Lip Vinyl Sheer lipgloss, the Magic Marc’er Precision Eye Pen liquid eye liner, and the Lip Lock Moisture Balm. The full collection will be available August 9 and will include 122 products.  I opted for the shadows.

The No. 7 palettes are a better value.  At $59 you get seven shadows in a range of finishes and .24 oz of product.  This comes out to about $8.50/shadow; not a bad deal for a high-end eyeshadow.  The No. 3 trios cost $42 for only three shades (though I am unsure of the product weight).  For an additional $17 you get four more shades.  Also, I was not in love with the choice of shades in the available trios.  If you are going to spend money on a high end product, you better love it.

The seven shadow palettes preview come in two color ranges: #202 The Tease and #204 The Starlet.   Tease is chock-full of with purples and pinky-tones: a purple sheen, matte grayish purple, matte pale pink, iridescent champagne sheen, metallic pastel pink w/gold shimmer, matte bright aubergine, and deep aubergine w/iridescent shimmer.  Starlet has a larger range of shades: a metallic muted lilac, metallic champagne pink, metallic dark copper brown, metallic bright copper, metallic gold, metallic bluish silver, and metallic gunmetal gray.  I purchased The Tease (see below for swatches and additional pics).

The packaging is very slender, glossy, and lightweight.  This would be a great palette to travel with as it is much less bulky than, say, the Urban Decay Naked palettes.  This can easily be stored in your purse and has a mirror inside.  The downside is that, even though it comes with a fabric protective case, as soon as you touch it there are big time, noticeable fingerprints.  This makes it look not so sleek and dirty in a hurry.

As for the shadows themselves, overall these are great.  The colors are absolutely beautiful.  Most of the shades are smooth and easy to blend; the shade #7 is the only one that is gritty.  Some have better pigmentation than others.  I find numbers 2,3, and 7 need to be built up a bit, but once they are they provide a gorgeous finish.  I wish the palette would have included a matte mid-tone brown for blending, but it does offer a couple of matte shades so it is not all shimmer and sheen.  These shadows have great staying power (I’m an oily girl, so that’s saying something!).

Is this palette worth picking up?  If you are in the market for high-end eyeshadow and could use an easily-blended palette to spice up a neutral collection-sure.  While not all high end makeup equals high quality, this definitely is (and it’s certainly more affordable than Dior).  Plus purples look great on every eye color.  It can be found here.  If you already own plenty of decent shadows then I wouldn’t break the bank for it.  Remember, at some point it’s just makeup.  You don’t need it to be beautiful.

Have you purchased any of the Marc Jacobs Beauty products?  Let me know what you got and how you like it in the comments below.  Thanks for reading.

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7 swatches. Pic by www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7 swatches. Pic by http://www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7 swatches. Pic by www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7 swatches. Pic by http://www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7 swatches. Pic by www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7 swatches. Pic by http://www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7. Pic by www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7. Pic by http://www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7. Pic by www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7. Pic by http://www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7. Pic by www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

Marc Jacobs Style Eye-Con No. 7. Pic by http://www.somethingtoconsiderblog.com

‘Good’ Looks?

English: Makeup before attendance. Српски / Sr...

English: Makeup before attendance. Српски / Srpski: Шминкање пред наступ. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“That which is striking and beautiful is not always good, but that which is good is always beautiful.” -Ninon de L’enclos

Have you ever stopped to think about what is in your makeup?  Unfortunately we cannot assume that if a product is allowed on the shelves it must be okay.  In fact, it may even be toxic.  Thanks to being born the only girl in a house full of boys, makeup has never been that important to me.  Still, I like to get dolled up on occasion, and I want to feel good about what I am putting on my face.  This post is not an alarmist scare tactic.  Rather, my opinion is that people should be educated about their products so they can make an informed decision.  Below is a list of personal care ingredients that are suspected toxins known as the “dirty dozen,” a brief description of the serious health concerns to which they are linked, and resources for finding non-toxic products.

  • BHA & BHT
  • Parabens
  • DEA-Realated Ingredients
  • Dibutyl phthalate
  • Formaldehyde-Releasing Preservatives
  • PEG Compounds
  • Coal Tar Dyes
  • Petrolatum
  • Siloxanes
  • Sodium Laureth Sulfate
  • Fragrance
  • Triclosan

While each ingredient affects us differently, some are known carcinogens, linked to organ toxicity, as well as birth defects, hormone disruption, cancer, skin rashes and irritations, allergens, asthma, and reproductive problems for both genders from either direct use or in utero exposure.  I enjoy makeup, but it is absolutely not worth those risks.  Some argue that many of these ingredients are considered low risk in small amounts.  However, people are not just exposed to them in a one-time use product.  Unfortunately, most personal care products contain one or several of these toxins, from lipstick to shampoo, lotion, soap, and more each and every day (not to mention toxins in other products such as food and cleaning products).  I would rather yield to the Precautionary Principle and limit them as much as possible.  It seems inconceivable that these ingredients would be allowed in so many of our products.

“Most consumer products are unregulated in the U.S., so manufacturers are allowed to use hazardous chemicals without demonstrating the safety of the products and without labeling them as toxic.” (Malkin, 2007).  Stronger regulation of cosmetic ingredients would help reduce or eliminate the risk posed by these components from the products that we put on our skin.  As the skin is our largest organ, the majority of what we put on it gets absorbed into our bodies.  Some of the ingredients above help products penetrate more deeply into our skin, causing us to absorb even more.  Many in-depth resources have been written about toxic ingredients and the lack of laws regulating their use, such as the references listed below.  If these ingredients are in so many products, how can they be avoided?

If you are like me, trying to decipher the ingredients list on a package can make your eyes cross.  What’s more, many of these products are listed under multiple names, such as the many types of siloxanes (generally they are listed as words ending in “–siloxane” and “–methicone”). Luckily there are search engines available that provide information on the safety of product ingredients.  I use Good Guide at www.goodguide.com and Skin Deep at www.ewg.org/skindeep. Each site pulls up a detailed rating regarding ingredient safety and toxicity.  Good Guide even has an app for smart phones.  Although I have found the regular search engine works a bit better, it is convenient to have it at my fingertips in the store.  It has enabled me to avoid purchasing a product with a low health rating numerous times.  Before you think this message is all gloom and doom, be encouraged that many products are available with safe ingredient alternatives (both affordable and high end).  And if you are motivated, you can take action.

-Urge your country’s leaders to pass legislation for safer personal care products.  If you live in the U.S., contact your representative and encourage them to co-sponsor the Safe Cosmetics and Personal Care Products Act of 2013 (H.R. 1385) here: http://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/5500/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=13369.

If you live in Canada, go here: http://action2.davidsuzuki.org/cosmetics.

-Support health-conscious businesses by purchasing their products that have safe ingredient ratings.  Do not assume that if a product is labeled “natural” or “organic” that they truly are.  Companies recognize that many consumers are interested in healthier product ingredients.  They are trying to capitalize on that, labeling products as natural and organic which are not.  This also happens due to the lack of regulation.  Also do not assume that just because a company makes certain products with low-risk ingredients that all of their products will have the same rating.

-Reduce the number of products you use each day.  And remember, you do not need makeup to be beautiful!  The times in my life I’ve worn the most makeup were when I was most insecure, which is no good reason to wear it.

-Contact cosmetic and personal care companies and retailers to let them know healthy product ingredients matter to you.  For a form letter to retailers, go here: http://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/5500/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=12309.

-Spread the word so others can make informed choices about their products.

-Stay informed through campaigns such as the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (http://safecosmetics.org/), Teens for Safe Cosmetics (www.teensturninggreen.org/ ), and the Breast Cancer Fund (www.breastcancerfund.org/), among numerous others (a list of more endorsing organizations can be found on the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics website).

Don’t be discouraged.  Many companies are making the move toward safer products for their consumers; products that work just as well if not better than the toxic alternative.  It simply takes a little extra time on our part to find them.  Each time we purchase them, we send a message that toxic makeup should be a thing of the past.  Companies will make what people will buy.  Thanks for reading.  Please let me know your favorite low-toxin personal care products in the comments below.

“Your beauty should not come from outward adornment, such as elaborate hairstyles and the wearing of gold jewelry or fine clothes. Rather, it should be that of your inner self, the unfading beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is of great worth in God’s sight.” 1Peter 3:3-4

References

Malkin, S. (2007). Not Just a Pretty Face: The ugly side of the beauty industry. Gabriola Island, BC, Canada: New Society Publishers.

Suzuki, D. (n.d.). “‘Dirty Dozen’ Cosmetic Chemicals to Avoid. In David Suzuki Foundation. Retrieved June 4, 2013, from http://www.davidsuzuki.org/issues/health/science/toxics/dirty-dozen-cosmetic-chemicals/

http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/

http://www.goodguide.com/

http://safecosmetics.org/

Watch my YouTube video on this topic:

Becoming a LUSHie: My Pursuit of Natural Hair & Skin Care

Lush

Lush (Photo credit: Pip)

The more I learn about the harsh chemicals in everything from food to shampoo, I’m tempted to move to a commune.  I’m not entirely joking.  We could raise grass fed animals, use natural ingredients for homemade products, and reduce our carbon footprints.  This is not a “scare blog” that is going to list how toxic and terrible everything is, causing you to run away to live in a cave.  Rather I want to highlight a brand I discovered last year and have loved using based both on how the products work and what the company stands for.   That company is LUSH.

Lush Cosmetics, or LUSH, is a UK-born company that makes products for hair, skin, and bath.  While that is nothing special, what the company stands for is: making safe and effective products that are truly natural and organic.  You don’t have to worry about their products being overly processed, genetically modified, or filled with enough preservatives to keep them good until the next millennium.  They care about the impact their company has on the environment and those who work to collect the material they use in their products, also known as ethical sourcing.  They care about animals, too.  LUSH does not test their products on animals, and they will not purchase any products from suppliers that test on animals.  Not only does the company believe in these things, they campaign for them.  They only use vegetarian ingredients, and many of their products are vegan.  As I got to know more about LUSH, the skeptic in me thought this sounded too good to be true.  I wanted to know what the downside was.

One aspect of the company some may see as a negative is their policy against unnecessary packaging.  While this has the environment in mind, some consumers may find it to be a bit of a turn off.  For example, when an item is packaged minimally there is higher risk of it breaking or getting damaged.  This does happen from time to time, especially since some of their products are more fragile.  For people who are environmentally conscious, this likely will not be a deterrent.  Another potential drawback, and perhaps the biggest one, is the cost of the product to the consumer.

While I wish I could tell you that their products are just as cheap as any you would find at Wal-Mart, I cannot.  Due to the ethical standards they uphold, their ingredients are more expensive than most anything you would find at the drugstore.  But why shouldn’t it be?  Doesn’t it make sense that this type of business model would create an increase in cost both to the business and the consumer?  I would rather spend more money on products I can feel good about than on a name brand department store product that is loaded with questionable ingredients made by a company apathetic toward their effect on the world.   LUSH products range anywhere from $1.95 to $89.95 (and higher for certain gift boxes).  Many of their products are affordable, and they have something for every age, gender, skin type, and hair type.

Just to be clear, I do not work for LUSH, am not affiliated with LUSH in anyway, nor do I receive any compensation whatsoever for writing this.  I’m just a die-hard LUSHie (i.e. consistent consumer of LUSH products that loves and raves about them, or as urbandictionary.com likes to describe us-“obsessed”) who wants to spread the word about their products.  The goods I have tried from there have had amazing results for my skin and hair, and I can use them in good conscience.

What do you think?  Leave a comment letting me know if you are pro natural/truly organic ingredients or if you think non-organic products are just fine (or if you are a fellow LUSHie!).  Interested in learning more about LUSH products, the company, and where you can find a LUSH near you?  Visit http://www.lushusa.com/  Thanks for reading.

Check out my YouTube video on some of my recent LUSH products